Anne White Hat — ‘Energy Transfer Partners tried to kill us in the Atchafalaya’

Read more of this story here from CENSORED NEWS by Brenda Norrell.

Anne White Hat --'Energy Transfer Partners tried to kill us in the Atchafalaya'By Anne White Hat Published with permission Censored NewsTalk about #BayousOfResistance!! (Oct. 17, 2018) The past 72 hours with our L’eau Est La Vie Crew have been nothing less than equal parts prayer, love, Ohitika, raw courage, and badassednessicity - to say the least. Those Energy Transfer Read more

Why there’s a legal fight to protect the native roundtail chub

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Bryce Newberry

Thursday, Oct. 18, 2018

Why there’s a legal fight to protect the native roundtail chub

PHOENIX – There’s a fundamental question over the roundtail chub, a minnow native to Arizona: Is it endangered or not?The Center for Biological Diversity in Tucson in August sued the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for not protecting it. But the Arizona Game & Fish Department, which works with the USFWS to protect existing native fish, says there's no reason to worry – the species is doing just fine.Brian Segee, senior attorney for the Center for Biological Diversity, contends the situation is dire.“The roundtail chub, whether it subsumes the other species of chub, the headwater chub and the Gila chub, is highly imperiled,” he said.Segee points to threats, including non-native fish, climate change, dam construction and human development along streams, as reasons why the roundtail chub – about 11 inches long, olive gray in color, with silvery sides and a white belly – should be listed as endangered.[caption id="attachment_101027" align="alignnone" width="800"] Sarah Taylor of the Arizona Game and Fish Department throws food into the man-made pond to feed roundtail chub at Bubbling Ponds Fish Hatchery in Cornville. The hatchery raises chub until they are big enough to be released in to the Verde River and its tributaries. (Photo by Nicole Neri/Cronkite News)[/caption]The fish, which historically has lived in pools and streams in the Upper and Lower Colorado River basins, was a candidate for endangered-species protection in 2015. That’s when Fish and Wildlife authorities proposed listing it to help keep the fish from extinction.But two years later, the agency revealed new scientific information that indicated the roundtail chub and two other chub species actually are identical. Suddenly, the chub population increased enough that the roundtail chub doesn’t needs protection.[related-story-right box-title="Related story" link="https://cronkitenews.azpbs.org/2015/10/06/feds-propose-endangered-species-act-protection-for-two-southwest-fish/" image="https://cronkitenews.azpbs.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/roundtail-chub-800.jpg" headline="Feds propose Endangered Species Act protection for two Southwest fish"]“It’s really hard to distinguish the species; they look very similar,” said Julie Carter, manager for the Arizona Game & Fish Department’s native aquatics program. “It became increasingly complicated when we were finding new populations of chub to know which they were.”The department’s hatchery in Cornville works to repopulate Arizona streams with roundtail chub.“We let them spawn naturally every year,” said Sarah Taylor, manager of the Bubbling Ponds Fish Hatchery, operated by Arizona Game & Fish. “We take out the young of the year in the wintertime once they’re big enough to handle a pond harvest. … And we take those fish out and stock them into Verde River, into either the main channel or into tributaries of the Verde River.”Depending on the year, hundreds or up to tens of thousands of roundtail chub are released into waterways. But the Center for Biological Diversity still wants action.“We just want the Fish and Wildlife Service to go back and do another status review and then decide whether or not to issue a proposed rule in a timeframe that would be around a year,” Segee said.The U.S. Department of Justice, which represents the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, has until Friday, Oct. 19, to respond to the suit. A spokesman for the service declined to comment, saying the agency doesn’t discuss ongoing litigation.Elemental: Covering Sustainability, a multimedia collaboration between Cronkite News, Arizona PBS, KJZZ, KPCC, Rocky Mountain PBS and PBS SoCal.Follow us on Twitter. Read more

Arizona has had at least eight cases of mysterious, polio-like disease

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Renata Cló

Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018

Arizona has had at least eight cases of mysterious, polio-like disease

WASHINGTON - Talen Spitzer was a healthy 10-year-old kid from Queen Creek a little more than two years ago when, in a matter of minutes, he lost control of his muscles and his hands were paralyzed.His mother, Rochelle Spitzer, said doctors did not know what was wrong with him at first because everything else seemed normal. But when scans at the hospital later showed lesions on his spine, he was diagnosed with acute flaccid myelitis, an extremely rare polio-like "mystery disease."Talen was one of eight patients in Arizona since 2014 who have been confirmed victims of the disease, which has no known cause.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week said it has confirmed a total of 386 cases of the disease, known as AFM, in at least 38 states and the District of Columbia since 2014, when it first surfaced in the Midwest. There have been 62 cases confirmed in 22 states so far this year, the CDC said.The disease primarily affects the young, causing weakness in muscles and paralysis in the lower limbs that eventually start rising toward the chest, according to Dr. Sean Elliott, professor of pediatrics at University of Arizona."They (patients) many times are not able to walk, they are unable to move onto legs very effectively, many are unable to even talk effectively," Elliott said. "The worst patients have had difficulty in breathing because, of course, we breathe using muscles as well."Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, said in a conference call Tuesday that AFM is a fairly new disease and that there is still a lot to learn about it.[caption id="attachment_101012" align="alignright" width="350"] Talen Spitzer was hospitalized two years ago with what turned out to be acute flaccid myelitis. The Queen Creek youth is almost fully recovered now, his mother said. (Photo courtesy Rochelle Spitzer)[/caption]Scientists do not know what causes it, how it spreads or even its long-term effects, Messonier said, according to a transcript of the call. They know it is not caused by the polio virus, even though its victims suffer polio-like symptoms, but that it has been linked to other viruses, including West Nile and enterovirus, and environmental factors.Researchers do know that rates spike in the fall and that more than 90 percent of cases are in children 18 or younger. But Messonier said she is "frustrated that despite all of our efforts," researchers have not been able to find a cause.Despite that, she said there are simple steps parents can take to protect their kids, including making sure children wash their hands, use bug spray and stay up to date on their vaccines.She also urged "parents to seek medical care right away if you or your child develop sudden weakness or loss of muscle tone in the arms or legs."Recovery is mixed. Elliot said there's no specific treatment for the disease, and that many patients recover spontaneously. The ones who don't "have a long road ahead of them with physical therapy, rehab," he said.Messonier said she only knows of one patient who had AFM and died in 2017. But Elliott said it appears that patients can die of complications caused by it and not the disease itself."If one is unable to breathe and does not get medical care, then yes, the death is due to respiratory failure," he said. "The illness itself ... seems to not cause death."During the worse part of his disease, Talen was prescribed with steroids and started undergoing physical therapy seven times a week."There's absolutely no way he would have been able to recover without therapy," Rochelle Spitzer said.Talen just turned 13 and is able to run and play soccer, although he still has some limitations like struggling to tie his shoes, Spitzer said.Messonier said AFM is extremely rare, affecting fewer than one person in a million. But Spitzer said it is important to raise awareness: She knows of another Arizona family with a child who's been diagnosed, and believes the condition is a lot "more common than it seems."Messonnier said that she understands "what it is like to be scared for your child. Parents need to know that AFM is very rare, even with the increase in cases that we are seeing now."Elliott said parents should alert, but should keep it in perspective."It's new. It's scary. It's a significant disease, but in terms of true national threat from infectious disease, of course, influenza, the flu season is far greater. There were 80,000 deaths from the flu last season in the United States," Elliott said. Read more

Hurricane tag team of Rosa and Sergio set rainfall records for October

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Jordan Evans

Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018

Hurricane tag team of Rosa and Sergio set rainfall records for October

PHOENIX – First there was Rosa, then came Sergio.Remnants of those downgraded hurricanes helped set rainfall records for Phoenix and made this the wettest October since record keeping began in 1895. Phoenix is 2.55 inches above the year-to-date normal.The steady rains flooded roads, closed schools and briefly shut down the Arizona State Fair, but Arizona’s decades-old drought persists.[related-story-right box-title="Related story" link="https://cronkitenews.azpbs.org/2018/10/16/lake-mead-water-shortage/" image="https://cronkitenews.azpbs.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/LakeMead-JE-1-800.jpg" headline="The cost of drought: Less water from Lake Mead in 2020, higher rates for consumers"]In addition, heavy rain falling in a short amount of time doesn’t necessarily have a direct impact on filling underground water supplies or shoring up reservoirs – main sources of the Phoenix area’s water.Bo Svoma, a meteorologist with Salt River Project, said the recent rain produced only “small inflows,” but that doesn’t mean the extra precipitation hasn’t helped.“What it has done is that it has moistened up the watershed, which means the future storms we will see this winter will be much more productive in producing inflow into our reservoirs,” he said.Svoma said Arizonans should not let their guard down about conserving water – especially because rain in metro Phoenix does not have a direct affect on the Colorado River. Arizona gets about 40 percent of its water from reservoirs on the Colorado, according to the Arizona Department of Water Resources.And Arizona had a dry winter last year, which meant less snowmelt from the Mogollon Rim and eastern Arizona, which feeds SRP reservoirs on the Salt and Verde rivers, according to Cronkite News. SRP is the largest supplier of raw water to metro Phoenix.[caption id="attachment_100039" align="aligncenter" width="800"] The parking lot of Taylor Auto Sales floods whenever it rains. The record amount of rainfall this season hasn't helped. Recent rains flooded roads, closed campuses and briefly shut down the Arizona State Fair. (Photo by Celisse Jones/Cronkite News)[/caption]However, this winter could bring some relief.The Climate Prediction Center forecasts a weak El Niño for the Pacific Ocean, a climate pattern that's expected to persist through the winter. For Arizona and states across the southern United States, that usually means a wet winter.Earlier this month, the remnants of Hurricane Rosa made it across Arizona, which brought heavy rains across the Sonoran Desert.At Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, rainfall measured 2.75 inches. That's more than the total from this year’s monsoon season – June 15 through Sept. 30 – of 2.63 inches.Ten days after Rosa, leftovers from Sergio hit, dumping 2.19 inches on Oct. 13.Sky Harbor’s official rainfall total so far for October stands at 5.32 inches. That makes this the wettest October on record, and the fourth wettest month ever. Daily records for Phoenix date to August 1895.If the airport gauge measures an additional 1.16 inches this month, October will become the wettest month on record. The National Weather Service has more rain in the forecast for this weekend.This story is part of Elemental: Covering Sustainability, a multimedia collaboration between Cronkite News, Arizona PBS, KJZZ, KPCC, Rocky Mountain PBS and PBS SoCal. Read more

Thinning effort to restore forests to their natural state inches forward

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Casey Kuhn

Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018

Thinning effort to restore forests to their natural state inches forward

FLAGSTAFF – On public land south of Mountainaire, nature lovers can enjoy a vista of thousands of lush ponderosa pines blanketing the base of the San Francisco Peaks.The dense forest is beautiful – and unnatural. It was sparse until humans changed the landscape in the late 19th century.And now, humans are trying to change it again. One way is through the Four Forest Restoration Initiative (4FRI), a partnership that includes the U.S. Forest Service, Arizona Game and Fish Department and the Grand Canyon Trust. The goal is to restore 2.4 million acres of pine stretching across northern Arizona from the Grand Canyon to the New Mexico line.Fighting the blazeThe program, which is being managed by a wealth of agencies, involves the Coconino, Tonto, Apache-Sitgreaves and Kaibab national forests.“What we want to try and do is restore the structure, pattern and composition of the forest to restore the function of the forest,” said Dick Fleishman, 4FRI's operations coordinator, who was part of a recent tour of a section of the Coconino National Forest near Mountainaire.That function includes fire, which, if a forest is thinned of excess trees, will burn low and slow through the underbrush. Older ponderosa pines have evolved to survive that kind of fire, not the hot and fast flames that come with something like the immense Wallow and Rodeo-Chediski fires – the largest in state history.4FRI also is designed to provide for wildlife and plant diversity.The restoration effort aims first for areas around Mountainaire and other communities within the forests."A fire can come through but does not set the entire stand of trees on fire and doesn't threaten homes because there's a barrier there where the forest is more open and fire can burn on the ground, lower to the ground in some of the smaller trees in a non-threatening way,” said Travis Bruner, interim conservation director at the Grand Canyon Trust.If a wildfire ripped through an overcrowded forest near communities, it could throw embers onto the land and be very destructive.Fleishman said the major wildfires create hundreds of millions of dollars of damage and years of consequences.Flood after fire“It’s the post-fire flooding, which can happen for several years afterward; it’s not just one-and-done," Fleishman said. "The fire is one-and-done, but the post-fire flooding is a couple years' worth of flood.”That’s because the embers bake the soil and leave a hard surface for monsoon rains to wash off. That runoff ends up in the chain of reservoirs that supplies about 60 percent of metro Phoenix’s water.“You have this vast amount of water that has all this energy and it just rushes across the landscape and it basically peels the soil and everything attached to it,” said Charlie Ester, surface water manager for Salt River Project.That nasty runoff after a large wildfire up north ultimately will affect cities downstream that have to treat this contaminated water for years.“Not to mention all the ash that’s leftover and other harmful chemicals as a result of the combustion of the trees," Ester said. "It really can result in poor water quality of our entire reservoir system.”The watershed’s natural cycle has changed thanks to human logging and ranching starting in the late 1800s.So far, the U.S. Forest Service has restored 186,000 acres of forest. But the 4FRI effort to thin those forests to their natural condition has been a bumpy road.Steve Rosenstock, Arizona Game and Fish Department's statewide coordinator for habitat enhancement, said Flagstaff passed a $10 million bond to help fund the effort.“That’s a very, very unique thing," he said. "In these times when budgets are tight, having that other source of funding can make the difference between a project happening or not.”The problem is that the Forest Service doesn’t have the resources to complete the giant task alone and in a timely manner, but attempts to enlist the timber industry’s help haven’t been easy.There aren't many economically viable ways to use the young trees, and there aren’t any lumber mills in Flagstaff.The partnership is still working to entice more businesses to help manage parts of the public land.Sustaining the environmentRosenstock said the value of a thinned forest is in its sustainability.“Mother Nature ultimately has the control over things, she holds the big levers," he said. "But we’re doing all we can, particularly in these kind of restoration efforts to get these systems back into balance, so they’ll be more capable of weathering those droughts when they do occur.”After the driest winter on record, and a normal monsoon season, the 2018 wildfire season was mild. But if more dry winters come as predicted, Arizona’s ponderosa pine forests could be a tinderbox waiting for an errant spark.This story is part of Elemental: Covering Sustainability, a multimedia collaboration between Cronkite News, Arizona PBS, KJZZ, KPCC, Rocky Mountain PBS and PBS SoCal.Subscribe to Cronkite News on YouTube. Read more

Suns’ Booker on Ayton: ‘My job is to make it special for him’

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Zachary Pekale

Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018

Suns’ Booker on Ayton: ‘My job is to make it special for him’

PHOENIX -- The expectations that come with being an NBA Draft lottery pick are something Devin Booker knows all too well. Selected 13th overall in the 2015 NBA Draft, the fourth-year wing has developed into a cornerstone of the Phoenix Suns franchise.However, it was at times a painful process. In his three years, Booker has not experienced a winning season. The Suns have a combined 68-178 record, bottoming out when they won only 21 games last season.That led to an opportunity. For the first time in franchise history, the Suns had the first overall pick in the draft and selected center Deandre Ayton, who spent one season with the Arizona Wildcats.Ayton makes his NBA debut Wednesday, and Booker’s goal is to help the rookie experience a memorable start to his career, minus the losing that Booker endured.“It’s the start of his legacy,” Booker said. “My job is to make it special for him and not make it like my first three years.“Let him be known as a winner. Let our whole organization turn around to a winning franchise.”Booker’s earliest seasons were highlighted by earning first-team honors on the NBA’s All-Rookie Teams, becoming the youngest player to score at least 60 points in a game when he poured in 70 against the Boston Celtics in March of 2017 and reaching 4,000 career points faster than any player not named LeBron James or Kevin Durant.[caption id="attachment_99288" align="alignright" width="300"] Deandre Ayton said he is "doing back flips in my mind" at the thought of his NBA career starting. (Photo by Justin Parham/Cronkite News)[/caption]But the statistical success did not translate to an improved team record.For Ayton, his desire to win is evident, but his first taste of professional basketball will also serve as a learning experience. The 20-year-old’s emotions are riding high ahead of the team’s season-opening game against Dallas and the third player taken in the summer’s draft, guard Luka Doncic.“I’m pretty excited, playing in front of all the fans,” Ayton said. “Obviously, I don’t want to show it. But trust me, I’m doing back flips in my mind right now.”Despite his age, Ayton’s role mirrors that of a polished veteran. Coach Igor Kokoskov has entrusted Ayton to protect the rim and be a vocal presence on defense, responsibilities he was not accountable for at Arizona.“Last year in college you didn’t see me protecting the rim as much,” he said. “Now I’m really trying to protect the rim every time, talking on defense to where I’m the coordinator.”Though it is safe to assume future All-Star selections and further league-wide recognition are waiting in the wings for Booker, the shooting guard wants his next step to involve winning. According to him, there are no excuses for not doing so.“Can’t say young team,” Booker said. “We have a lot of veterans around. Still young players but every team has that.“I think we’re in a position now where we have the players and now we just have to build that chemistry together and come out here and get wins.”Follow us on Instagram. Read more

Intereses y valores: La Espiritualidad de La Madre Tierra v. Materialismo del Capitalismo Global

Read more of this story here from Comités de Defensa del Barrio by chantlaca.


En una ocasión escuche a un diplomático mexicano decir, “estados unidos no tiene amigos, solo intereses.” Pero eso no solo aplica a estados unidos, sino a todos los estados en las naciones unidas. 

Sin embargo, la equivocación es pensar que los intereses de los que hablamos son de los estados. Los intereses son intereses corporativos manifestados a través del aparato gubernamental en cualquier parte del mundo y pronto será en cualquier parte donde esos intereses sean afectados, desde la atmósfera extraterrestre hasta las mismas galaxias.

Me dijo una vez un taquero que no tenía ni primaria pero que era dueño de varias loncheras y propiedades en México. “Todos tenemos nuestros intereses.” Y si, así es.  La iglesia tiene interés en “salvar almas:” O más bien alimentar el miedo impuesto por ellos mismos de la condena infinita contra los pecadores. 

Y con eso, con el interés de salvar almas alimentan los intereses desde los capos de las drogas hasta los intereses del Trompudo Donald Trump.

El trabajador de fábrica tiene interés en ganar un salario, no solo para darle de comer a sus hijos sino para pagar los diezmos de la iglesia, los intereses programados por la televisión desde modas hasta estilo de auto, lavadora automática, y televisión.


Entonces hay intereses naturales de vivir en la madre tierra como, comida, abrigo, y lugar donde vivir.  Y hay intereses programados, totalmente ajenos a nuestra madre tierra como lujos, cosméticos, estilos, y vanidad.

Los manipuladores de intereses son vampiros energéticos que no solo se chupan los recursos de nuestra madre tierra, sino chupan nuestra creatividad, pensamiento y sudor de nuestra frente. De que otra manera se explica que un indígena trabaje para el Buró de Asuntos Indígenas, BIA aquí en estados unidos. O que un Maya trabaje para lo que un tiempo se llamara Instituto Nacional Indigenista en México. O que un Dineh trabaje para las minas Peabody que extraen los minerales sagrados de la madre tierra. O que un Raramuri trabaje en los cultivos de Mariguana en la sierra, o un Mayo en los cultivos de Amapola en Sinaloa.

Entonces como vemos, si, si hay intereses pero pocos son los intereses que importan, y los que importan son los intereses de nuestra madre tierra, nuestro aire que respiramos, nuestra agua que nos da vida, y nuestro fuego que nos da calor. Sé que lo que digo entrará por un oído y nos saldrá por el otro a la mayoría de nosotros.



Pero la única razón que estamos como estamos en este globo terrestre, es que estamos luchando por intereses que no son nuestros y en última instancia no importan; para la sobrevivencia de la tierra y todas sus criaturas, plantas y seres vivientes.

Los soldaditos en Iraq, Afganistán, Siria, luchan por intereses inventados como democracia, libertad y justicia, pero que en realidad esconden que van a dar la vida por el petróleo y las ganancias de Exxon, Shell, y ahora hasta PEMEX. 

Es por eso que desconectarnos de las grandes corporaciones, seria mucho mas efectivo que mil marchas fútiles que no cambian nada porque esos mismos radicales al final del día irán al ATM del Banco Wells Fargo, Banco de América u otro para ir a comer a McDonald’s, Burger King, o Dennys, para seguir protestando y alimentando a los vampiros energéticos.

Salvador Reza 

 
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