Flake joins other senators, wins delay on Kavanaugh after allegation

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Brendan Campbell

Monday, Sept. 17, 2018

Flake joins other senators, wins delay on Kavanaugh after allegation

WASHINGTON – Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake and a handful of other Republican senators broke with leadership Monday and won a delay of a scheduled vote on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, after allegations of a decades-old sexual assault surfaced. Flake was quoted in published reports Sunday saying he is "not comfortable voting yes" on the nomination until the accuser has a chance to tell her story – that Kavanaugh forced himself on her at a party in the early 1980s, when both were in high school in suburban Washington. Fellow Republican Sens. Bob Corker of Tennessee and Susan Collins of Maine also called for the Senate Judiciary Committee, which had been scheduled to vote on Kavanaugh Thursday, to hear testimony from Christine Blasey Ford, the woman who made the allegation. By Monday afternoon, they got their wish, when the committee announced another day of hearings on Kavanaugh's nomination. It has been set for Monday, Sept. 24. In a statement released Monday by the White House, Kavanaugh called Ford's charge "a completely false allegation." "I have never done anything like what the accuser describes – to her or to anyone," his statement said. "Because this never happened, I had no idea who was making this accusation until she identified herself yesterday." Ford, who is now an experimental psychologist and professor at Palo Alto University, originally made her charge confidentially in a letter to California lawmakers, but came forward this weekend after her allegation was leaked. "Anyone who comes forward, as Dr. Ford has done, deserves to be heard," said Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley in a statement announcing the new hearing date. "My staff has reached out to Dr. Ford to hear her account and they held a follow-up call with Judge Kavanaugh this afternoon." But the Iowa Republican complained that Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-California, the ranking Democrat on the committee, was only now bringing forward Ford's charge, which she received in July. "Ultimately, committee Democrats have refused to join us in this effort," he said of the new hearing. "However, to provide ample transparency, we will hold a public hearing Monday to give these recent allegations a full airing." That was echoed by President Donald Trump, who said Monday that he wished "the Democrats could have done this a lot sooner ... but with all of that being said we want to go through the process." He defended Kavanaugh as someone who "never even had a little blemish on his record." Judiciary Committee Democrats, meanwhile, called on the White House to instruct the FBI to investigate Ford's "credible allegations of serious misconduct," which Feinstein sent to the agency on Sept. 12. In a statement Monday, White House spokesman Raj Shah said Kavanaugh "looks forward to a hearing where he can clear his name of this false allegation. He stands ready to testify tomorrow if the Senate is ready to hear him." But outside the Supreme Court Monday afternoon, advocates and liberal groups rallied to demand a delay on the nomination vote or a withdrawal of his nomination – a notion Trump called "ridiculous." The protest, originally planned as a Constitution Day event organized by the Center for American Progress, included groups advocating for everything from reproductive rights to transgender equality, who attacked the Kavanaugh nomination. Fatima Goss Graves, president and CEO of the National Women's Law Center, began her remarks by reminding the dozens gathered in the pouring rain of Anita Hill's testimony against then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas in 1991, calling Hill's treatment a continued "stain on this country and this court." "This moment deserves more," Goss Graves said. "It calls out for something that is fair, that is comprehensive, that tells not just Dr. Ford, but tells all survivors that we see you, we hear you, we know you deserve better." Neera Tanden, president and CEO of the Center for American Progress, praised Flake for stepping forward over the weekend. "The people of Arizona should be very proud of Sen. Flake for standing up at a time when many wouldn't, to get to the truth of what happened. It honors the women of Arizona and America as well," Tanden said. "Americans deserve a public hearing in which Dr. Ford is able to testify to her experience." Read more

Flake joins other senators, wins delay on Kavanaugh after allegation

Read more of this story here from Cronkite News RSS Feed by Cronkite News RSS Feed.

Brendan Campbell

Monday, Sept. 17, 2018

Flake joins other senators, wins delay on Kavanaugh after allegation

WASHINGTON – Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake and a handful of other Republican senators broke with leadership Monday and won a delay of a scheduled vote on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, after allegations of a decades-old sexual assault surfaced. Flake was quoted in published reports Sunday saying he is "not comfortable voting yes" on the nomination until the accuser has a chance to tell her story – that Kavanaugh forced himself on her at a party in the early 1980s, when both were in high school in suburban Washington. Fellow Republican Sens. Bob Corker of Tennessee and Susan Collins of Maine also called for the Senate Judiciary Committee, which had been scheduled to vote on Kavanaugh Thursday, to hear testimony from Christine Blasey Ford, the woman who made the allegation. By Monday afternoon, they got their wish, when the committee announced another day of hearings on Kavanaugh's nomination. It has been set for Monday, Sept. 24. In a statement released Monday by the White House, Kavanaugh called Ford's charge "a completely false allegation." "I have never done anything like what the accuser describes – to her or to anyone," his statement said. "Because this never happened, I had no idea who was making this accusation until she identified herself yesterday." Ford, who is now an experimental psychologist and professor at Palo Alto University, originally made her charge confidentially in a letter to California lawmakers, but came forward this weekend after her allegation was leaked. "Anyone who comes forward, as Dr. Ford has done, deserves to be heard," said Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley in a statement announcing the new hearing date. "My staff has reached out to Dr. Ford to hear her account and they held a follow-up call with Judge Kavanaugh this afternoon." But the Iowa Republican complained that Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-California, the ranking Democrat on the committee, was only now bringing forward Ford's charge, which she received in July. "Ultimately, committee Democrats have refused to join us in this effort," he said of the new hearing. "However, to provide ample transparency, we will hold a public hearing Monday to give these recent allegations a full airing." That was echoed by President Donald Trump, who said Monday that he wished "the Democrats could have done this a lot sooner ... but with all of that being said we want to go through the process." He defended Kavanaugh as someone who "never even had a little blemish on his record." Judiciary Committee Democrats, meanwhile, called on the White House to instruct the FBI to investigate Ford's "credible allegations of serious misconduct," which Feinstein sent to the agency on Sept. 12. In a statement Monday, White House spokesman Raj Shah said Kavanaugh "looks forward to a hearing where he can clear his name of this false allegation. He stands ready to testify tomorrow if the Senate is ready to hear him." But outside the Supreme Court Monday afternoon, advocates and liberal groups rallied to demand a delay on the nomination vote or a withdrawal of his nomination – a notion Trump called "ridiculous." The protest, originally planned as a Constitution Day event organized by the Center for American Progress, included groups advocating for everything from reproductive rights to transgender equality, who attacked the Kavanaugh nomination. Fatima Goss Graves, president and CEO of the National Women's Law Center, began her remarks by reminding the dozens gathered in the pouring rain of Anita Hill's testimony against then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas in 1991, calling Hill's treatment a continued "stain on this country and this court." "This moment deserves more," Goss Graves said. "It calls out for something that is fair, that is comprehensive, that tells not just Dr. Ford, but tells all survivors that we see you, we hear you, we know you deserve better." Neera Tanden, president and CEO of the Center for American Progress, praised Flake for stepping forward over the weekend. "The people of Arizona should be very proud of Sen. Flake for standing up at a time when many wouldn't, to get to the truth of what happened. It honors the women of Arizona and America as well," Tanden said. "Americans deserve a public hearing in which Dr. Ford is able to testify to her experience." Read more

Despite cries for Rosen, Cardinals coach Wilks sounds committed to Bradford

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Harley Yearout

Monday, Sept. 17, 2018

Despite cries for Rosen, Cardinals coach Wilks sounds committed to Bradford

TEMPE – A 34-0 loss against the Los Angeles Rams has Arizona Cardinals coach Steve Wilks scrambling for answers for the second consecutive week. It appears, however, that he has an answer for the fans that are clamoring for Cardinals rookie quarterback Josh Rosen to replace nine-year veteran Sam Bradford. “If I thought it was just that one position, I would be more than willing to say, ‘You know what? We need to make a change,’” Wilks said Monday afternoon. “But it’s not just Sam (Bradford).” The offensive unit as a whole has been stagnant, as the Cardinals have been outscored 58-6 in their first two games. Bradford, many would argue, is at the center of it. In addition to his 243 passing yards through two games, ranked 30th in the league, Bradford has a 55.6 passer rating, worst out of 32 qualified quarterbacks in the NFL. Despite those subpar numbers, Wilks isn’t ready to place the team’s offensive issues on Bradford. “I think Sam (Bradford) is doing well,” he said. “Is he inconsistent? Yes. Does he need to be a little more accurate? Yes. But that’s not just Sam.” Through the first two weeks, the Cardinals are averaging the fewest yards per game (175) out of any NFL team. “I’m disappointed as a whole that we aren’t more productive on the offensive side of the ball,” Wilks said. In an effort to combat the team’s offensive woes, Wilks plans to create different schemes to create less thinking for his players going forward. More importantly, he plans to give running back David Johnson the ball more going forward. Johnson has started slow after missing the 2017 campaign with a wrist injury, carrying 22 times for just 85 yards. His last full season as a starter, Johnson electrified the league to the tune of 1,239 rushing yards and 16 touchdowns. Moving past an underwhelming first two weeks, the Cardinals host the Chicago Bears in week three with a chance to get their offense on the right track for the first time this season. Connect with us on Facebook. Read more

U.S. Targets Volunteers Who Aided Immigrants

Read more of this story here from Truthdig RSS by Ilana Novick.

Nine members of No More Deaths, an Arizona faith-based advocacy group, are facing federal charges, including—for some—harboring and conspiracy. Their crimes? Providing food, water and a place to stay for migrants attempting to cross the U.S. border with Mexico. According to a report from The Intercept on Sunday, the Justice Department is “fighting to keep the communications of law enforcement officials celebrating [the nine members’] prosecution from becoming public.”

During the summer of 2017, No More Deaths members responded to distress calls from migrants crossing the border at the Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge, which the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service calls “incredibly hostile to those that need water to survive.”

The volunteers attempted to contact the U.S. Border Patrol for help, but according to The Intercept, their calls went unanswered for hours. Taking matters into their own hands, the volunteers drove their pickup trucks into the desert. But while Border Patrol agents ignored the calls, they began tracking the volunteers’ movements, which they would do for more than a year.

Last week, lawyers for the volunteers filed motions to convince Arizona Magistrate Judge Bruce Macdonald to drop the charges. Attached to those motions were exhibits that included text messages between U.S. Border Patrol and Fish and Wildlife Service agents, in which they appear to be celebrating the volunteers’ upcoming arrests and charges.

The Justice Department moved to seal the motions, but The Intercept was able to download them from a court records database called PACER (Public Access to Electronic Records) before it could. According to The Intercept:

<blockquote>The exhibits include text messages between a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employee and a Border Patrol agent, in which the Fish and Wildlife employee declares ‘Love it’ in response to the prosecution of the volunteers. Described in the text messages as ‘bean droppers,’ volunteers with the group No More Deaths and their organization are referred to by name in the communications between federal law enforcement officials, who describe, with apparent glee, the government’s ‘action against them.’</blockquote>

Additional evidence that the government specifically targeted No More Deaths includes a meeting with Robin Reineke, a cultural anthropologist and director of the Colibrí Center for Human Rights, an internationally renowned organization that repatriates the remains of migrants who die in the desert. In what The Intercept calls a sworn declaration, Reineke says that during the meeting, “a senior Border Patrol agent angrily told her that because of the bad press No More Deaths stirred up for his employer, the agency’s plan was to ‘shut them down.’ ”

“I got a really strong sense of retribution, revenge,” Reineke told The Intercept, adding, “he didn’t like what No More Deaths was saying to the press about Border Patrol. … I really got the strong impression that he wanted to see the camp shut down and gone.”

The Justice Department is requesting that Reineke’s declaration be sealed, too.

Nine members of No More Deaths are facing at least misdemeanor charges. One, Scott Warren, also is battling harboring and conspiracy charges, because he gave two immigrants food, water and a place to stay for three days.

Read more and see the documents at The Intercept.

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TUSD sup’t Gabriel Trujillo continues to allow harassment in TUSD from the “Fisher Plaintiff”: Whistleblowers

TUSD sup’t Gabriel Trujillo continues to allow harassment in TUSD from the “Fisher Plaintiff”: Whistleblowers

Our permission is granted to media, bloggers, and others to publish our letter. We are the sole authors of our letters.

76th Open Letter to the Community:

ShEEE’s BACK! Gloria Copeland Back at Sahuaro High School Interfering with its Operation and the Board and Superintendent Do Absolutely Nothing

From: TUSD Whistleblowers– Comprised of a Large Group of Extremely Concerned TUSD Administrators, Teachers, Former Students/Class of 2018, Retired Administrators, Parents, & Grandparents

ShEEE’s Back! read more

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More play: New Arizona law requires schools to provide two recesses

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Micah Alise Bledsoe

Monday, Sept. 17, 2018

More play: New Arizona law requires schools to provide two recesses

GILBERT – A new Arizona law, pushed by advocates who say playtime burns off energy and helps younger students learn, requires public schools to expand recess from one period daily to twice a day for students in kindergarten through third grade. Expanded recess in district and charter schools, which started this semester, will be extended to Grade 5 in the 2019-20 school year. Christine Davis, founder of Arizonans for Recess and School Wellness, said her group spent two years persuading the Legislature to expand recess. The organization believes children need regular and often frequent play breaks during the school day to improve academic performance. “District leaders should promote recess, given its many benefits for kids and classrooms, and provide more professional development to educators on classroom management, to reduce the off-trend bad practice of withholding recess,” Davis wrote in an email. Recess that is provided only once a day violates a long-established Arizona Department of Education standard, she said. An August report by the American Academy of Pediatrics suggests play deprivation is associated with increasing rates of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD. [caption id="attachment_98743" align="alignright" width="300"] Kerri Jones said expanding recess to twice a day has helped her daughter, Alexa, be less stressed at school. (Photo by Micah Bledsoe/Cronkite News)[/caption] The law does not set aside a specific schedule or time limit for recess, although some schools provide at least one recess before the day starts. The recess also does not have to be outdoors. It’s mainly meant as a break in the routine, advocates say. Kerri Jones of Chandler said an extra recess is a good thing. Her daughter, Alexa, a second-grader at Basha Elementary in the Chandler Unified School District, said she doesn’t like it when recess is canceled because of rain or excessive heat. That means she has to be confined to the classroom to play interactive learning games. “I’d rather do math,” she said. The law does not specify when schools should hold the second recess. In Gilbert, San Tan Charter School Principal Amanda Errington said she leaves it up to her teachers to decide. “They’re the professionals, they’re with their kids,” Errington said. She said her school, which teaches pre-kindergarten through Grade 7, goes beyond the requirements of state law. Elementary school students have three recesses daily. Even middle-school students have a lunch recess where they head outside to the playground. No one should make students sit for eight hours a day, Errington said. “Kids are still kids,” she said. Connect with us on Facebook. Read more

Bisbee ’17’ documentary recounts ‘shameful moment’ in Arizona history

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Hana DeMent

Monday, Sept. 17, 2018

Bisbee ’17’ documentary recounts ‘shameful moment’ in Arizona history

PHOENIX – America had just entered the “war to end all wars” in Europe. Demand for metal ore was rising. Unionists and radical socialists of the International Workers of the World were demanding better wages and conditions from corporations across the country. A strike against copper giant Phelps Dodge in Jerome had just been crushed. That was the backdrop in Bisbee on July 12, 1917, when a deputized mob of townspeople rousted 1,200 miners from their homes at gunpoint. The mob marched the miners – mostly immigrants from Mexico and Eastern Europe who had struck Phelps Douglas seeking safer conditions – to the town’s baseball field before forcing the men into filthy cattle cars and shipping them 200 miles to Tres Hermanas, New Mexico, with little food or water. There, they were taken off the train and told to never return to Bisbee. The documentary “Bisbee ’17” tells the story of Bisbee residents who last year re-enacted the July 12, 1917, deportation. The film was screened at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival before premiering in New York. Now, it’s showing in select theaters in Flagstaff, Prescott, Scottsdale, Sierra Vista, Tucson and Yuma.
Producer Bennett Elliott said the film was shown in Bisbee in July on the 101st anniversary of the deportations. “We had a weeklong series of events and we did three sold-out screenings, so we know that they like it,” Elliott said. Director Robert Greene, as Elliott listened and sometimes joined the conversation, described how the film connects the past to the present and why Arizona is special. The interview, conducted in Phoenix, has been lightly edited and condensed. What can the audience expect to learn from this film? One hundred years ago, 1,200 striking miners – most of them immigrants from Mexico, from Eastern European and other places – were rounded up by gunpoint because they were striking for better wages and working conditions. They were considered anti-American. They were considered anti-war because we had been in World War I for just a few months. They were rounded up, put on cattle cars at the ballpark and then dropped in the middle of the desert and left there. It's a shameful moment in our history. It’s a shameful moment in Bisbee’s history. How did you discover the story? I started going to Bisbee in 2003 when my future mother-in-law bought a tiny mining cabin there just to have a summer home or just a place to visit for holidays, like a lot of people do in Bisbee. She’s a historian and she was fascinated with the history of the place. I went there and immediately got Robert Houston’s book, Bisbee ’17, which was a fictional version of the story. This was many years before I made my first feature. I knew we wanted to make a film out of it. My first instinct was maybe we could re-create the Bisbee deportation with locals in town and I had no idea what that could mean. Many years later, I had gone to Bisbee many times. I had family that lived there and family that had left on my wife’s side. I just never shook that story. Then we realized that it was the 100th anniversary of the deportation and we decided to go back. So we went to town and we documented what the town was doing to commemorate the centennial themselves. On top of that we collaborated with the locals to re-create the deportation. Why do a documentary about a century-old deportation using Bisbee residents? The important thing is that when you see these re-creations happening you know the characters and you know what their feelings are. It's not about just escaping into the story. In some ways, it's really about the present and the people who are making this happen today. The ’17 in Bisbee ’17 is 2017. How do you think Arizona residents will respond to the movie? This is where the story needs to be told. I think people will be surprised by it, if they haven't heard about the deportation. But I think it also does speak to many elements of what people know in Arizona. The immigrant issues, labor issues, were conjuring a lot of things in the film. I would like to say that we are going to start some conversations. That's the idea. What struggles emerged from using residents of the town for this film? We could have written a fictional version of the movie but the point is, how is Bisbee reckoning with this? Is there anything else that you would like to share? It’s just really special to be here in the state. People fall in love with Arizona. You drive around and you see all these different landscapes, all the different places. The first place I ever went was Tucson and then, to Bisbee. I just love the place so much. Connect with us on Facebook. Read more

‘Onondaga 15 Go To World Court’ by Mohawk Nation News

Read more of this story here from CENSORED NEWS by Brenda Norrell.

ONONDAGA 15 GO TO WORLD COURT Posted on September 11, 2018 MOHAWK NATION NEWS In the case of Jones et al. v. Parmley, et al, No. 17-928, the sovereign Onondaga 15 of the rotinoshonni, Iroquois Confederacy, are instituting proceedings in the International Court of Justice in The Hague, against the United States and its justice system. It is pursuant to Article 45 of the Rules Read more

‘Onondaga 15 Go To World Court’ by Mohawk Nation News

Read more of this story here from CENSORED NEWS by Brenda Norrell.

ONONDAGA 15 GO TO WORLD COURT Posted on September 11, 2018 MOHAWK NATION NEWS In the case of Jones et al. v. Parmley, et al, No. 17-928, the sovereign Onondaga 15 of the rotinoshonni, Iroquois Confederacy, are instituting proceedings in the International Court of Justice in The Hague, against the United States and its justice system. It is pursuant to Article 45 of the Rules Read more