Looming Trade War Could Hurt US-China Cooperation On North Korea

Read more of this story here from Newsy Headlines by Newsy Headlines.


Watch Video

It seems like it's getting harder and harder to keep the ongoing nuclear talks with North Korea from getting caught up in a brewing trade war between the U.S. and China.

Case in point: The White House threatened China with another round of punitive tariffs — right before Chinese President Xi Jinping met with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.

Kim's visit shows China is still a critical player in North Korean diplomacy. North Korea wants China's help in easing the heavy international sanctions draining the North Korean economy, and Beijing has supported the idea.

SEE MORE: Obama's Former Advisor Says U.S. Would Lose Trade War To China

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo affirmed that China was committed to working with the U.S. on sanctions last week. But China might be less eager to work with Pompeo after his comments this week about China's economy.

Pompeo said, "Let's be clear: It's the most predatory economic government that operates against the rest of the world today."

The U.S. is now compiling a list of $200 billion in Chinese imports to tax at 10 percent. That's after China and the U.S. both levied a 25 percent tariff on $50 billion worth of goods.

The White House is targeting China's Made in China 2025 program, which aims to restructure China's economy to focus on high-tech manufacturing. The White House has labeled that program a national security threat and accused China of using underhanded tactics to pursue it.

So far, the two issues have been kept pretty much separate. But if trade relations get worse, it could be much less politically appealing for the U.S. and China to collaborate on North Korea.

Additional reporting from Newsy affiliate CNN.

Read more

More Governors Refuse To Send Troops To Border Amid Family Separations

Read more of this story here from Newsy Headlines by Newsy Headlines.


Watch Video

Four more governors are suspending the deployment of their states' National Guards in protest of the Trump administration's practice of separating migrant children and parents at the U.S. border.

Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo said Tuesday she will not send any of her state's National Guard to the border. And Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan, North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper and Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam said they would each recall members of their state's National Guards. Hogan also ordered one of Maryland's helicopters to return until the policy is rescinded.

As Newsy previously reported, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper and Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker said Monday they won't send National Guard troops to the border. 

Cuomo refused to send a National Guard unit to the border, while Hickenlooper signed an executive order prohibiting his state's resources from being used to separate children from their guardians over their immigration status. And Baker told reporters he is not going to send a helicopter crew to the border because he said separating children from their guardians is "cruel and inhumane."

Read more

What WHO’s Gaming Addiction Diagnosis Means For The US

Read more of this story here from Newsy Headlines by Newsy Headlines.


Watch Video

The World Health Organization now classifies gaming as a potentially addictive behavior. It says the move is meant to spur more research and start figuring out effective treatments. But the move may not mean much to patients in the U.S.

WHO, which is part of the United Nations, added gaming disorder to its International Classification of Diseases, or ICD. The ICD is the international standard for reporting diseases and health conditions worldwide. 

“It should be a clearly defined behavioral pattern which is of such intensity and such nature that it takes precedence of other activities that have been important for the individual in the past,” Dr. Vladimir Poznyak, a member of WHO's Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse said. 

SEE MORE: WHO Says Playing Video Games Persistently Could Be Bad For Your Health

But the ICD doesn't hold as much sway in the U.S. as it does abroad. Instead, mental health professionals use the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders from the American Psychiatric Association. The DSM and the ICD are similar, but so far, the DSM doesn't recognize gaming disorder. 

That may change, though. The newest edition of the DSM identified internet gaming as a condition "warranting more clinical research and experience." But making it a full disorder can be a slow process. 

"It doesn't come out every year. We're talking about a book that came out in 2013. That was five years ago, a lot has happened since then. So it becomes irrelevant very quickly, in regard to technology," said internet addiction expert Kimberly Young.

The most recent update took 14 years of research and feedback before it was published, meaning a new edition that includes gaming could still be years away. 

Even though nearly half of Americans play video games, making the jump to addiction is another thing entirely. Studies show that less than 1 percent of the general population would qualify for having the potential to develop a gaming disorder. 

Additional reporting from Newsy affiliate CNN

Read more

Sports Fans Shake The Ground So Much, It Spawned A New Kind Of Science

Read more of this story here from Newsy Headlines by Newsy Headlines.


Watch Video

When Mexico's national soccer team scored the go-ahead goal to defeat the defending German champs, El Tri's fanbase celebrated so hard seismologists detected their movement as an artificial earthquake. This might seem far-fetched, but tiny fan-caused earthquakes are actually relatively common at large sporting events.

In fact, these tremors happen so frequently in places where soccer is popular that they're known as "footquakes." Fans in Mexico City might not have felt the shaking, but two seismographs detected earthquake-like vibrations. Spanish researchers have found that every time FC Barcelona scores a goal at its 90,000-capacity stadium, the ensuing celebrations can trigger seismometers half a kilometer away.

The study of ground shakes around stadiums is part of a burgeoning field called urban seismology. Researchers say human-caused tremors can teach them more about how the signals from natural earthquakes travel. They say tools originally designed to study earthquakes might also be inexpensive ways to monitor subway or traffic activity.

SEE MORE: Surprise World Cup Victory Really Shook Mexico — Literally

Or other sports. In a 2011 NFL playoff game, former Seattle Seahawk Marshawn Lynch scored a touchdown and caused a seismic reaction now known as the "Beast Quake." The Seahawks wound up inviting a researcher out to do live monitoring of seismic activity during playoff games. 

And occasionally, just the activity of the sport itself shakes the ground. In NASCAR the cars, helicopters, and machines in the races can generate much more seismic activity than fans. 

Additional reporting from Newsy affiliate CNN

Read more

A New VA Report Examines The Suicide Rate Among Veterans

Read more of this story here from Newsy Headlines by Newsy Headlines.


Watch Video

According to a Department of Veterans Affairs report released Monday, veterans are twice as likely as non-veterans to die by suicide. 

The agency examined data from 2005 through 2015 across the U.S., aiming to improve its suicide prevention program. It found an increase in rates of suicide among veterans, aligning with recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention statistics on the rise in suicide rates for the general population. The findings note those rates went up more quickly in veterans who didn't receive care from the agency's health administration. 

According to the analysis, 20 veterans die by suicide each day, a number that hasn't changed since it was first reported by the VA in 2016.

If you need to talk to someone about suicide prevention, text "HOME" to the Crisis Text Line at 741-741.

Read more

Attorneys General Demand An End To Separation Of Immigrant Families

Read more of this story here from Newsy Headlines by Newsy Headlines.


Watch Video

Nearly two dozen Democratic attorneys general are demanding that the Trump administration put an end to a policy that separates migrant children from their guardians at the border.

New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas and attorneys general from 20 other states penned the letter to Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen and U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions. In it, they call the Justice Department's "zero-tolerance" policy inhumane, a violation of the Constitution and a violation of children's rights.

The letter says the policy would be "illegal under most state laws" and claims it directly interferes with the jobs of local, national and international law enforcement officials. The coalition of attorneys general says the practice "must be stopped."

A bipartisan group of 75 former U.S. attorneys are also calling on Sessions to put an end to the practice. In an open letter, the group condemns the Trump administration's policy, saying, "We know that none of these consequences  —  nor the policy itself  —  is required by law."

The White House says the crisis at the border is due to loopholes in the immigration system and has called on Congress to close them.

Read more

Report: 2.4M US Homes At Risk Of Chronic Flooding By End Of 2100

Read more of this story here from Newsy Headlines by Newsy Headlines.


Watch Video

new report estimates that more than half a million people in the U.S. may have to deal with their homes chronically flooding by the year 2045.

As Newsy previously reported, global sea levels are rising. And scientists estimate they're going to keep rising by as much as 6.6 feet by the end of the century.

So the Union of Concerned Scientists paired its previous research on areas already known to be at a high flood risk with data from Zillow, a real estate website, to estimate how many properties in the contiguous U.S. could be hit hard by the rising sea levels.

It determined that nearly 311,000 homes along U.S. coastlines are at risk of flooding 26 times a year by 2045. To put that in perspective — that means those properties could flood about once every other week.

And by the end of the century, the scientists say the number of homes flooding that persistently could grow to as many as 2.4 million, along with more than 100,000 business properties.

The report concluded by 2100, Florida, New Jersey and New York will have the most homes affected by rising sea levels. 

The scientists noted these results were based off "a high sea level rise scenario" — meaning levels rising by more than 6 feet. Still, they said these estimates show how important it is to prepare for the negative economic impact rising sea levels will cause and how homeowners and communities will require support from local, state and federal government to prepare and take action.

Read more

Facebook Fundraiser To Reunite Immigrant Families Raises Over $4M

Read more of this story here from Newsy Headlines by Newsy Headlines.


Watch Video

In a little over three days, more than 100,000 people raised more than $4.7 million through a Facebook fundraiser to benefit immigrant families separated at the U.S.-Mexico border.

It's called "Reunite an immigrant parent with their child" and was started on June 16 by Charlotte and Dave Willner and Malorie Lucich McGee. The original goal of the fundraiser was $1,500.

The money raised will go to the Texas nonprofit organization called Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services. It says it provides legal services, opportunities for education and social support for immigrants and refugees. 

USA Today reports Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg are among those who have donated. 

In April, the Trump administration announced its "zero tolerance" immigration policy. As part of that policy, the U.S. government has been separating migrant children from their families when they enter the U.S. illegally.

The RAICES team posted on Facebook saying they didn't have the words to thank the fundraiser's organizers. 

Read more

The US Is Suspending A Major Military Exercise With South Korea

Read more of this story here from Newsy Headlines by Newsy Headlines.


Watch Video

Days after President Donald Trump promised to end "war games" with South Korea, the U.S. announced it's canceling a major military exercise with the South.

The Pentagon said in a statement the U.S. military has suspended all planning for the Ulchi Freedom Guardian defense exercise, which was supposed to take place in August.

Chief Pentagon spokesperson Dana White said, "We are still coordinating additional actions. No decisions on subsequent war games have been made."

After meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un in Singapore last week, Trump said the war games would stop "unless and until we see the future negotiation is not going along like it should."

The U.S. and South Korea carry out joint military exercises throughout the year. But North Korea's not a big fan of the drills, and the country has cited them as a reason it needs to have a nuclear arsenal.

Read more