Nearly A Million People Protest For A Brexit Revote

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Hundreds of thousands of people in London took to the streets to protest the United Kingdom’s impending exit from the European Union. 

Organizers estimated about 700,000 protesters took part in Saturday’s “People’s Vote March.”

The protesters are demanding that a second referendum take place, saying that new information like the cost and complexity of the exit may impact people’s desire to leave.

British Prime Minister Theresa May has passed on the idea of a revote. At a recent speech she remarked, “We had the people’s vote and the people chose to leave.”

In the region’s first referendum, 52 percent of voters favored leaving the EU. May has struggled to negotiate a withdrawal deal with the trading bloc, but warned the she’s open to leaving with no deal at all.

 Britain is currently slated to exit the EU on March 29.

Additional reporting from Newsy affiliate CNN

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Greek Prime Minister Welcomes Macedonia Name-Change Vote

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Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras says Macedonia's recent decision to change its name will bring the country closer to joining "international organizations."

On Friday, the Macedonian Parliament took the first step toward changing the country's name to the Republic of North Macedonia. The full name-change procedure requires two more rounds of voting in Parliament and could take months.

Greece has historically rejected Macedonia's name, which it argues belongs to the northern Greek region of the same name. It has subsequently blocked the country's attempts to join the EU and NATO.   

The former Yugoslav republic hopes changing its name will open the door for Macedonia to join those organizations. While Tsipras welcomed the move, other members of his own government have been less receptive. 

The leader of the right-wing Independent Greeks party that's part of Tsipras' governing coalition has threatened to break up the coalition if the Greek Parliament also approves the name change. 

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Russian National Charged With Interfering In Upcoming Election

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The Justice Department has accused a Russian national with interfering in the upcoming November election. It says a Russian woman named Elena Alekseevna Khusyaynova from St. Petersburg managed a multimillion-dollar budget for online propaganda to "sow division and discord" ahead of the midterms. 

The unsealed criminal complaint describes a Russian effort to use topics like immigration, gun control, the Confederate flag, race relations, LGBTQ issues, the Women's March and the NFL national anthem debate to "inflame passions." The social media posts allegedly manipulated multiple political viewpoints but frequently targeted the GOP.

The complaint says Russian oligarch Yevgeny Prigozhin and his companies funded the $35 million budget. Prigozhin is currently facing a criminal charge from special counsel Robert Mueller for allegedly funding a similar attack on the 2016 election.

The New York Times reports unsealing the complaint on Friday is the Trump administration's latest attempt to make Americans aware of election interference. 

Khusyaynova lives in Russia, so she can avoid extradition to the U.S. Typically, these charges wouldn't become known until she traveled to a country where she could be detained.

Additional reporting from Newsy affiliate CNN.

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Afghans Head To The Polls, Despite Taliban Attacks

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Afghans headed to the polls Saturday, even as violent attacks in the country looked to discourage participation. 

A suicide bombing at a polling place in Kabul reportedly killed at least 15 people and injured dozens more. Attacks leading up to the vote have left several candidates and more than 30 other civilians dead.

The Taliban has claimed responsibility for many of those attacks, including one in Kandahar province that left Kandahar's police chief dead. The group says the election is an American-orchestrated sham.  

Aside from violence, the election — which the government has delayed for three years, citing security concerns — has also been plagued by allegations of fraud from critics of Afghan president Ashraf Ghani. Opposition parties had argued for an additional delay to the vote to implement anti voter-fraud measures.  

Additional reporting by Newsy affiliate CNN.

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75,000 People’s Data Compromised Signing Up For The ACA

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75,000 people have had their data compromised through one of the Affordable Care Act's enrollment portals. That's according to a statement released by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services on Friday.

The Associated Press reports credit and personal information like "Social Security numbers, income, and citizenship or legal immigration status" are all details people provide to seek coverage.

8.7 million people used Healthcare.gov to sign up for health plans in 2018, so the affected 75,000 is actually a small percentage. But the statement said the department considers any breach unacceptable. 

This comes a few weeks before the six-week enrollment period for Affordable Care Act health care coverage starting in November. The hacked system was reportedly shut down and officials are hoping to get it back up and running in time.

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US Moves To Leave Nuclear Weapons Treaty With Russia

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The U.S. is reportedly planning on leaving a major nuclear weapons treaty with Russia that's been in place for more than 30 years. 

The New York Times reports National Security Advisor John Bolton planned to share the U.S.'s plans to leave the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty with Russian officials on his visit to Moscow Saturday. 

President Ronald Reagan and General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev signed the treaty in 1987. It prohibits land-based nuclear missiles with ranges from 310 to 3,420 miles. 

Since 2014, the U.S. has accused Russia of violating the treaty by testing and deploying banned missiles near its borders with former Soviet countries. 

One motivation for the U.S.'s withdrawal is reportedly China. The country isn't part of the treaty and administration officials have said that gives Beijing an advantage in the pacific. 

Additional reporting by Newsy affiliate CNN.

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Julian Assange Sues Ecuador For Violating His ‘Fundamental Rights’

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WikiLeaks co-founder Julian Assange has taken legal action against the Ecuadorian government, arguing his "fundamental rights" have been violated.

This is in reference to recent house rules the Ecuadorian government implemented for Assange's stay in its London embassy. He has been living there since 2012 and risks being arrested if he leaves.

The new rules include things like Assange having to pay for his own medical bills, get prior approval when having visitors, to clean up his bathroom and tend to his cat. He is suing Ecuador's foreign minister to have the rules changed, as the minister serves as the middleman between Assange and the Ecuadorian government.

Assange's lawyers argue the new rules breach their client's rights, which should be granted to him as part of his asylum.

Ecuador's foreign affairs minister said Friday the country will respond to the lawsuit "in an appropriate manner," and that the rules didn't violate international standards or Ecuadorian law.

Additional reporting by Newsy affiliate CNN.

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Does ‘Dear Abby’ Have A Point About ‘Foreign’ Baby Names?

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In a recent advice column, "Dear Abby" tries to dissuade a couple from giving their child an Indian name. She argues that "foreign names" can be "difficult to pronounce and spell" and a name "that sounds beautiful in a foreign language can be grating in English."

Some critics are calling the column racist and guilty of cultural imperialism. One tweet says, "As a south Asian myself, I'd say if they can pronounce Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninov, they can certainly pronounce Indian names."

But bearing an unusual name can have implications later in life, like when job hunting. A study found that white-sounding names received 50 percent more callbacks for interviews than black-sounding names. And another study found that when minority applicants "whitened" their resume by deleting racial cues, they were more likely to hear back from employers.

"Abby" may have a point. Practically speaking, "white-sounding names" may have advantages, but some Twitter users say their names are about meaning and cultural heritage. Barack Obama spoke about that back in 2004. 

"They would give me an African name, Barack, or 'blessed,' believing that in a tolerant America, your name is no barrier to success," said Obama.

But others struggled with their names, like TV host Padma Lakshmi. She got tired of telling people how to pronounce her name, so she went by the name "Angelique" for a time in high school.

"Even people who saw me regularly, weekly at the gym or something, would call me Pamda, Panda, Padbu," Lakshmi said on "The Late Late Show with James Corden." 

Lakshmi went on to embrace her name. Today, she was one of the "Dear Abby" critics. On a tweet she says: "Names have meaning. They have history. They tell us who we are and where we come from."

White-sounding names" may be advantageous now, but that may shift in the future. Immigrant populations and language diversity have been increasing in the U.S. One in five U.S. residents speaks a different language, and in 2044 minorities will make up the majority of the population.

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Saudis Say Jamal Khashoggi Is Dead, But Their Story Draws Skepticism

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President Donald Trump says he believes the Saudi explanation for dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi's death is credible.

Saudi state television said Friday Khashoggi was involved in a fight at the consulate that eventually led to his death. The government also said it's investigating 18 Saudi nationals in connection to Khashoggi's death. The president reportedly called the arrests, "a big step."

Khashoggi was a vocal critic of the Saudi government. He disappeared more than two weeks ago after going to visit the Saudi consulate in Istanbul. Turkish authorities have said the Saudi government sent a team to kill Khashoggi and get rid of his body. 

Saudi officials also announced Friday they had removed a senior intelligence official from office — the same official previous reports had indicated might be blamed for Khashoggi's killing.  

The Saudi government had originally denied any knowledge of Khashoggi's disappearance, and said he left the consulate the same day he visited. 

"They, evidently, have underestimated the level of outrage that the world now feels," said Connecticut Sen. Richard Blumenthal.

Despite the president's comments, the new Saudi narrative has already been met with skepticism by prominent U.S. lawmakers from both sides of the aisle. 

Additional reporting by Newsy affiliate CNN.

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Some Members Of Migrant Caravan Cross Into Mexico

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After initially closing the border with Guatemala, Mexican authorities have reportedly started letting some members of a migrant caravan across. 

CNN reports police have let some women and children through the barriers they've set up. Authorities deployed tear gas and closed the border after the caravan's first attempt to cross led to altercations.

The caravan — which started its journey in Honduras on Oct. 12 with about 160 people — now consists of at least 3,000 individuals. 

The Associated Press reported most of the migrants made it to a town on the Guatemala-Mexico border by Thursday evening. In preparation for their arrival, the Mexican government reportedly sent hundreds of federal police officers to step up security on its side of the border. 

Mexico is seeking assistance from the United Nations refugee agency to help identify which migrants have legitimate asylum claims. Individuals will need to apply for refugee status if they don't have the proper travel documents allowing them to enter the country. 

American officials are also watching the situation closely.  On Thursday, President Donald Trump threatened to close the U.S.'s border with Mexico over the caravan. The president has also threatened to cut aid to Central American countries that allow the migrants to pass.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo met with his Mexican counterpart in Mexico City Friday, and said Mexico will handle the issue of the caravan. Pompeo also said the U.S. is approaching a "moment of crisis" on immigration. 

Additional reporting from Newsy affiliate CNN

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