As Far-Right Groups Incite Violence on Both Coasts, Officials Struggle to Respond

Read more of this story here from Truthdig RSS by Ilana Novick.

On the East and West coasts over the weekend, far-right demonstrators clashed with police and counterprotesters. These were the latest in series of incidents in which local law enforcement officials were unprepared to address the fallout.

In a highly publicized incident, nine members of the far-right group Proud Boys and three counterprotesters were arrested in a clash after a speech by Proud Boys leader Gavin McInnes at New York’s Metropolitan Republican Club.

During his speech, McInnes “waved a sword at anti-fascist protesters and celebrated the assassination of a socialist Japanese politician … dressed up as the Japanese assassin who killed the politician, complete with glasses that made his eyes into a racist caricature of a Japanese person’s eyes,” according to the Daily Beast.

The incident, writers Kelly Weill and Will Sommer observe, “highlights how the Proud Boys have managed to insinuate themselves with mainstream Republicans, even as they increasingly make the news for their violence.”

Weill and Sommer continue:

<blockquote>Representatives Mario Diaz-Balart and Devin Nunes have posed for pictures with Proud Boys on the campaign trail. Fox News anchor Tucker Carlson posed in a Fox green room with two Proud Boys and Republican operative Roger Stone earlier this year.

Stone has himself taken steps to be initiated into the Proud Boys and made headlines in March, when he used the Proud Boys as a security force at the Dorchester Conference, a Republican event in Oregon. By then, the Proud Boys were already notorious in Oregon for a series of bloody Portland brawls.</blockquote>

Across the country, the fight was ongoing in Oregon.

A number of members of the Proud Boys are also in Patriot Prayer, another far-right group involved in clashes with protesters this week. Members came to downtown Portland for a rally Saturday on one day’s notice. Billed as a march for “law and order,” it quickly escalated into bloody fights. According to Oregon Live, members of the militia and anti-fascist protesters “used bear spray, bare fists and batons to thrash each other,” before riot police waded into the violence.

The incident made national headlines, but it wasn’t the first time an extreme-right group incited violence in downtown Portland. In fact, during a similar August rally, members of Patriot Prayer were stationed on top of a building with a cache of weapons, a fact that Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler admitted only Monday, over two months later.

Wheeler told a news conference that prior to the start of the August rally, “the Portland Police Bureau discovered individuals who positioned themselves on a rooftop parking structure in downtown Portland with a cache of firearms.” Those weapons included long guns. Splinter explains in its coverage of the incident that “the term ‘long gun’ typically refers to a rifle with a lengthy barrel for shooting at distance. It’s a blanket term that can also include shotguns.” However, writer Jack Crosbie observes, “it seems unlikely to me that it refers to a shotgun in this case.”

Wheeler held the news conference to introduce an emergency ordinance that, Crosbie writes, “will give the police greater authority to separate groups during a confrontation, if it’s voted through by the City Council this week.”

Wheeler emphasized he “will not allow continued, planned street violence between rival factions to take place in Portland,” adding, as Willamette Week reports, that he has asked his staff “to evaluate options to hold accountable those who recklessly drain our public safety resources by using our city as a venue for planned street violence.”

Saturday’s violence, and the delayed announcement of the weapons cache at the August rally, is “raising questions about why Portland police and political leaders are allowing the violent dueling clashes to continue month in and month out,” Gordon R. Friedman writes in Oregon Live.

Asked by reporters why the weapons weren’t mentioned sooner, Portland Chief of Police Danielle Outlaw said, “Hindsight is always perfect.”

As these groups continue to ingratiate themselves into mainstream Republican circles, it will take more than an ordinance from a local government to fight back.

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TEA President Jason Freed rallies TUSD teachers to fight federal court-ordered diversity plans

The email at the bottom was just sent to all TEA members from Jason Freed, President of the Tucson Education Association and deals with consistently campaigning by TEA against the District’s teacher diversity plan.

This diversity plan was designed to hire more ethnic/racial minorities and to more evenly assign minority and non-minority teachers throughout the District; this way schools are neither comprised of predominantly white teachers or minority teachers.

The National Education Association also supports teacher diversity plans.

However, teacher seniority, in the eyes of TEA, is more important than the objective of a court-ordered teacher diversity plan. As seen in the letter below from Jason Freed to his membership, the TUSD Board has been lobbied by him and many TEA members against a diversity plan required by a Federal Desegregation Order. This has resulted in a Board resolution which will be discussed at tonight’s Board Meeting.

If passed, it will result in TUSD appealing the court order of September 6, 2018, to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, which will once again be very costly and drain desegregation funds to deal with adult issues. It will also take attention away from student-focused matters.

Many teachers have complained that TEA’s membership is at an all-time low and that its membership is comprised of predominantly of white teachers. TEA refuses to provide statistics on its membership and its membership’s ethnic/racial composition but if what teachers are reporting is true, the data itself would support the need for a diversity plan focused on teachers.

TEA President letter below:

I am writing you a stand-alone message about an extremely concerning piece of information of which we just became aware. This will require your immediate attention, as well as participation on the part of you and your colleagues. Please read below:

In an attempt to gain full Unitary Status, which will mean that TUSD would no longer be under court supervision, TUSD filed for and received Partial Unitary Status just last week. By and large, this is good for employees, students, and the community, as it indicates that TUSD is addressing racial disparities within our community. Buried in the 152-page document, there is one significant section in the “Partial Unitary Status Order.” The Order calls for a change in hiring practices in TUSD. Please read the direct quotes from the Order below:

“The USP, which requires that TUSD ‘increase the number of experienced teachers and reduce the number of beginning teachers hired to teach in racially concentrated schools or schools in which

Read more

TEA President Jason Freed rallies TUSD teachers to fight federal court-ordered diversity plans

The email at the bottom was just sent to all TEA members from Jason Freed, President of the Tucson Education Association and deals with consistently campaigning by TEA against the District’s teacher diversity plan.

This diversity plan was designed to hire more ethnic/racial minorities and to more evenly assign minority and non-minority teachers throughout the District; this way schools are neither comprised of predominantly white teachers or minority teachers.

The National Education Association also supports teacher diversity plans.

However, teacher seniority, in the eyes of TEA, is more important than the objective of a court-ordered teacher diversity plan. As seen in the letter below from Jason Freed to his membership, the TUSD Board has been lobbied by him and many TEA members against a diversity plan required by a Federal Desegregation Order. This has resulted in a Board resolution which will be discussed at tonight’s Board Meeting.

If passed, it will result in TUSD appealing the court order of September 6, 2018, to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, which will once again be very costly and drain desegregation funds to deal with adult issues. It will also take attention away from student-focused matters.

Many teachers have complained that TEA’s membership is at an all-time low and that its membership is comprised of predominantly of white teachers. TEA refuses to provide statistics on its membership and its membership’s ethnic/racial composition but if what teachers are reporting is true, the data itself would support the need for a diversity plan focused on teachers.

TEA President letter below:

I am writing you a stand-alone message about an extremely concerning piece of information of which we just became aware. This will require your immediate attention, as well as participation on the part of you and your colleagues. Please read below:

In an attempt to gain full Unitary Status, which will mean that TUSD would no longer be under court supervision, TUSD filed for and received Partial Unitary Status just last week. By and large, this is good for employees, students, and the community, as it indicates that TUSD is addressing racial disparities within our community. Buried in the 152-page document, there is one significant section in the “Partial Unitary Status Order.” The Order calls for a change in hiring practices in TUSD. Please read the direct quotes from the Order below:

“The USP, which requires that TUSD ‘increase the number of experienced teachers and reduce the number of beginning teachers hired to teach in racially concentrated schools or schools in which

Read more

TEA to host TUSD candidate debate after endorsing two candidates

Tonight will be the first forum for the candidates running for a seat on Southern Arizona’s largest school district, TUSD. The event is hosted by the TEA, the teacher’s union and its president Jason Freed is advocating for everyone to show up and for help in “re-electing Adelita Grijalva to the Governing Board.”

So come out and learn about the candidates, but we’ve already decided who you should vote for? How’s that for a fair forum?

To canvass with Adam Ragan, send RSVP to a standwithraul.com email address.

Furthermore, “finding the best two candidates… is imperative.” Given that Adelita Grijalva has been canvassing with Adam Ragan, and since Adelita knows what is best for TUSD, is this whole façade of a fair forum just a rally for Adelita and her boy Adam? read more

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As Far-Right Groups Incite Violence on Both Coasts, Officials Struggle to Respond

Read more of this story here from Truthdig RSS by Ilana Novick.

On the East and West coasts over the weekend, far-right demonstrators clashed with police and counterprotesters. These were the latest in series of incidents in which local law enforcement officials were unprepared to address the fallout.

In a highly publicized incident, nine members of the far-right group Proud Boys and three counterprotesters were arrested in a clash after a speech by Proud Boys leader Gavin McInnes at New York’s Metropolitan Republican Club.

During his speech, McInnes “waved a sword at anti-fascist protesters and celebrated the assassination of a socialist Japanese politician … dressed up as the Japanese assassin who killed the politician, complete with glasses that made his eyes into a racist caricature of a Japanese person’s eyes,” according to the Daily Beast.

The incident, writers Kelly Weill and Will Sommer observe, “highlights how the Proud Boys have managed to insinuate themselves with mainstream Republicans, even as they increasingly make the news for their violence.”

Weill and Sommer continue:

<blockquote>Representatives Mario Diaz-Balart and Devin Nunes have posed for pictures with Proud Boys on the campaign trail. Fox News anchor Tucker Carlson posed in a Fox green room with two Proud Boys and Republican operative Roger Stone earlier this year.

Stone has himself taken steps to be initiated into the Proud Boys and made headlines in March, when he used the Proud Boys as a security force at the Dorchester Conference, a Republican event in Oregon. By then, the Proud Boys were already notorious in Oregon for a series of bloody Portland brawls.</blockquote>

Across the country, the fight was ongoing in Oregon.

A number of members of the Proud Boys are also in Patriot Prayer, another far-right group involved in clashes with protesters this week. Members came to downtown Portland for a rally Saturday on one day’s notice. Billed as a march for “law and order,” it quickly escalated into bloody fights. According to Oregon Live, members of the militia and anti-fascist protesters “used bear spray, bare fists and batons to thrash each other,” before riot police waded into the violence.

The incident made national headlines, but it wasn’t the first time an extreme-right group incited violence in downtown Portland. In fact, during a similar August rally, members of Patriot Prayer were stationed on top of a building with a cache of weapons, a fact that Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler admitted only Monday, over two months later.

Wheeler told a news conference that prior to the start of the August rally, “the Portland Police Bureau discovered individuals who positioned themselves on a rooftop parking structure in downtown Portland with a cache of firearms.” Those weapons included long guns. Splinter explains in its coverage of the incident that “the term ‘long gun’ typically refers to a rifle with a lengthy barrel for shooting at distance. It’s a blanket term that can also include shotguns.” However, writer Jack Crosbie observes, “it seems unlikely to me that it refers to a shotgun in this case.”

Wheeler held the news conference to introduce an emergency ordinance that, Crosbie writes, “will give the police greater authority to separate groups during a confrontation, if it’s voted through by the City Council this week.”

Wheeler emphasized he “will not allow continued, planned street violence between rival factions to take place in Portland,” adding, as Willamette Week reports, that he has asked his staff “to evaluate options to hold accountable those who recklessly drain our public safety resources by using our city as a venue for planned street violence.”

Saturday’s violence, and the delayed announcement of the weapons cache at the August rally, is “raising questions about why Portland police and political leaders are allowing the violent dueling clashes to continue month in and month out,” Gordon R. Friedman writes in Oregon Live.

Asked by reporters why the weapons weren’t mentioned sooner, Portland Chief of Police Danielle Outlaw said, “Hindsight is always perfect.”

As these groups continue to ingratiate themselves into mainstream Republican circles, it will take more than an ordinance from a local government to fight back.

Read more

Obama-era Student Loan Relief Program Can Now Take Effect

Read more of this story here from Newsy Headlines by Newsy Headlines.


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A federal judge ruled Tuesday that an Obama-era student loan relief program can take effect immediately.

The Borrower Defense to Repayment rule is meant to protect students from for-profit colleges that violated the law or took advantage of vulnerable people. Borro  wers can apply to have their student loans forgiven if their school is found to have engaged in predatory lending.

For some background: The Obama-era rule was set to take effect in July 2017. But weeks before that, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos postponed the regulations. Nineteen states and the District of Columbia sued to delay her postponement. And in September, a judge sided with the 19 states and the district, ruling her delay of the program was "unlawful."

The Education Department said it would not file a new delay.

Additional reporting from Newsy affiliate CNN.

Read more

Obama-era Student Loan Relief Program Can Now Take Effect

Read more of this story here from Newsy Headlines by Newsy Headlines.


Watch Video

A federal judge ruled Tuesday that an Obama-era student loan relief program can take effect immediately.

The Borrower Defense to Repayment rule is meant to protect students from for-profit colleges that violated the law or took advantage of vulnerable people. Borro  wers can apply to have their student loans forgiven if their school is found to have engaged in predatory lending.

For some background: The Obama-era rule was set to take effect in July 2017. But weeks before that, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos postponed the regulations. Nineteen states and the District of Columbia sued to delay her postponement. And in September, a judge sided with the 19 states and the district, ruling her delay of the program was "unlawful."

The Education Department said it would not file a new delay.

Additional reporting from Newsy affiliate CNN.

Read more

Obama-era Student Loan Relief Program Can Now Take Effect

Read more of this story here from Newsy Headlines by Newsy Headlines.


Watch Video

A federal judge ruled Tuesday that an Obama-era student loan relief program can take effect immediately.

The Borrower Defense to Repayment rule is meant to protect students from for-profit colleges that violated the law or took advantage of vulnerable people. Borro  wers can apply to have their student loans forgiven if their school is found to have engaged in predatory lending.

For some background: The Obama-era rule was set to take effect in July 2017. But weeks before that, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos postponed the regulations. Nineteen states and the District of Columbia sued to delay her postponement. And in September, a judge sided with the 19 states and the district, ruling her delay of the program was "unlawful."

The Education Department said it would not file a new delay.

Additional reporting from Newsy affiliate CNN.

Read more

‘Halloween’ Is A Horror Classic — But Does It Need A Tenth Sequel?

Read more of this story here from Newsy Headlines by Newsy Headlines.


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"Halloween. The night he came home."

Apologies in advance for the nightmares this video induces.

John Carpenter's "Halloween" came out in 1978. It's a film that forever changed the slasher subgenre, and forty years later, it's getting another sequel.

The 2018 installment of "Halloween" is actually the eleventh film in the franchise, and the third direct-sequel to the original.

If that sounds confusing, that's because the horror franchise is a bit of a bloody mess. Its disconnected timelines keep getting retconned and rebooted — much to the annoyance of the original film's creator. 

In 2014, John Carpenter told Deadline: "I didn't think there was any more story, and I didn't want to do it again. All of my ideas were for the first Halloween – there shouldn't have been any more!"

SEE MORE: Today's Horror Films Are Hitting Too Close To Home

So, why were there ten more films? Because the original was that good.

In its lifetime, the 1978 film has grossed $47 million. That's a huge success for a horror movie, especially considering it had a production budget of just $325,000.

That success completely changed the slasher subgenre — inspiring other horror franchises like "Friday the 13th."

In 2006, the Library of Congress recognized "Halloween's" cultural significance and inducted the movie into its National Film Registry. 

An essay published by the National Film Preservation Board said the original "Halloween" stands on it own, but critics are already praising the 2018 sequel.

"This is as good as I've seen since we did the first movie."

It's even been endorsed by John Carpenter, who also modernized his original soundtrack for the new movie.

The film pits Jamie Lee Curtis's Laurie Strode against killer Michael Myers for the fifth time. It comes out Friday, Oct. 19. 

"It is going to scare the sh*t out of ya. I guarantee it."

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Taking it one class at time: Arizona ‘dreamers’ find it hard to afford college after court ruling

Read more of this story here from Cronkite News RSS Feed by Cronkite News RSS Feed.

Abdel Jimenez

Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2018

Taking it one class at time: Arizona ‘dreamers’ find it hard to afford college after court ruling

PHOENIX – Saray Escobar Gomez dreams of becoming a teacher and is just three courses shy of completing her associate’s degree at Paradise Valley Community College.However, as a DACA recipient, Gomez said it will take her longer to complete that degree after the Arizona Supreme Court’s April 2018 ruling that DACA recipients – who also are known as Dreamers – are ineligible for in-state tuition, leaving many of them with few options and resources for the school year.“I had to cut my time as a full-time student,” Gomez said. “It slowed me down.”She attends one of the Maricopa Community Colleges, where tuition for the school year is $326 per credit hour for non-residents compared with $85 per credit for Maricopa County residents.“My mother … and I join what we earn together, and that’s how we make it,” Gomez said, referring to getting financial support from her mom to finish her degree.DACA – the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program – is a Barack Obama-era policy that protects from deportation young immigrants who were brought to this country as children. It was implemented in 2012 after Congress failed to pass the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act.Last month, a federal judge in Texas rejected part of a lawsuit from that state and eight others seeking an injunction to stop DACA. Pro-immigration activists applauded the decision allowing Dreamers to continue applying for this program, which also provides them with a two-year work permit.According to the most recent data from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, more than 26,200 active DACA recipients live in Arizona.Gomez is one of them and said she won’t allow her immigration status, currently in limbo, to prevent her from acquiring her dreams.“I think I’ll do it. I believe in myself, and my family believes in me, too,” Gomez said about finishing her studies.Other students in the same boat are weighing their options, including going to trade school to learn to be a technician, mechanic or a similar career.[caption id="attachment_100853" align="alignright" width="300"] Isabel Pimentel, a DACA recipient, is considering a profession in real estate instead of going to college after the Arizona Supreme Court struck down in-state tuition for ‘dreamers’ in April 2018. (Photo by Abdel Jimenez/Cronkite News)[/caption] Isabel Pimentel said she has been entertaining the idea of becoming a real estate agent.“I’ve been trying to save up, and I’ve been coming up with little plans to see if it can help me boost (my college-education fund) a little faster,” Pimentel said. “I wanted to go get my real estate license so I can start doing that on the side.”But the main problem boils down to money for these Dreamers.Pimentel said she relies on her job at an Amazon Fulfillment Center to raise money for college.“I’ve been trying to stay at Amazon for as long as I can because after a year of being with them, they will pay for school,” she said.DACA students cannot receive federal student aid, commonly known as the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, but they can get private scholarships.Tuition reimbursement through an employer is another way for Dreamers to pay for college, but companies have different policies that require employees to work a certain amount of hours and study in certain areas to receive the full benefits.Karina Ruiz, executive director for the Arizona Dream Act Coalition, said despite the challenges, DACA recipients shouldn’t abandon their studies, and she suggested they consider out-of-state college options.“A lot of students are talking about dropping out, and we’ve had those conversations, too. We had those conversations with students that you need to expand your horizons,” Ruiz said. “We know St. Mary’s in Texas is giving a scholarship for students that are undocumented.”There are 274 DACA students enrolled for the fall 2018 semester at Arizona State University, an increase from 259 from the same time period in 2017.In a statement, the university stated its support:“ASU remains committed to DREAMers and DACA students in particular. These individuals are among the most resilient students in the higher education system. A recent decision by the Arizona Supreme Court did not change DACA students’ near universal commitment to achieving their goals, nor did it cause Arizona State University to alter its steadfast commitment to making higher education a reality for all Arizona high school graduates, including those who have DACA status.”ASU offers more resources through DREAMzone, an organization providing support for undocumented and DACA students.For now, Gomez said she will continue to pursue her college education despite the court’s ruling, no matter how long it takes.“It’s definitely going to take some time,” she said, “I am going to be taking a few classes each time.”Subscribe to Cronkite News on YouTube. Read more

BAYOU BRIDGE: Water Protectors Rescued after Boats Intentionally Hit with Wave

Read more of this story here from CENSORED NEWS by Brenda Norrell.

Twelve people, including a media crew, were rescued on Monday after Bayou Bridge pipeline resisters boats were intentionally sankL'eau Est La Vie Camp - No Bayou BridgeALERT! (10/15): Early this morning, while two boats carrying water protectors and media were legally observing a bayou bridge pipeline construction site, an Energy Transfer Partners security boat rapidly passing by Read more

Ebola Experts In Congo Pulled From Some Of The Hardest-Hit Areas

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Health workers in the Democratic Republic of Congo are facing more challenges in the fight against Ebola.

CNN reports that CDC personnel stationed there have been pulled out of the hardest-hit areas due to safety concerns, including an uptick in violence.  

The experts had been working in some of the DRC's "hot spots" to help control the ongoing outbreak of the virus. 

According to the World Health Organization, there have been more than 200 confirmed Ebola cases, including more than 130 deaths. 

On Wednesday, the WHO will meet to decide whether the situation is an an international public health emergency, and to discuss recommendations to manage the outbreak.

In September, the agency deemed the risk of regional spread of the virus "very high." 

This is the second outbreak Congo has seen this year. 

Additional reporting from Newsy affiliate CNN

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Australia PM Takes A Cue From Trump Ahead Of Local Election

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Australia's Prime Minister Scott Morrison is taking a cue from President Donald Trump on two major geopolitical issues. 

Morrison made an unexpected announcement that he's open to moving the country's embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. The move would break with the country's longstanding policy on Israeli-Palestinian relations.

"Now, in relation to our diplomatic presence in Israel, what I have simply said is this: We are committed to a two-state solution," Scott Morrison said.

The Guardian reports Morrison is also considering reviewing Australia's role in the Iran nuclear deal. In May, Trump decided to pull the U.S. out of the 2015 agreement because it didn't address the country's ballistic missile program or its support for armed groups in places like Yemen or Syria.

All of this comes before a Saturday election where the Jewish population is about 12 percent. Opposition Senator Penny Wong accused Morrison of using important foreign policy issues in an inappropriate attempt to win votes.

Additional reporting from Newsy affiliate CNN.

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