Armenian Lawmakers Will Vote For A New Prime Minister Soon


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Armenian lawmakers will vote for a new prime minister May 1.

The former Prime Minister Serzh Sargsyan resigned Monday after more than a week of protests called for him to step down.

Sargsyan had been president of Armenia since 2008. Then, as his second and last term was winding down, the country’s constitution was amended to give the position of prime minister more power and make the presidential seat more of a ceremonial role.

Eight days after his presidential term was up, Sargsyan was elected Armenia’s prime minister. Anti-government protesters took to the streets and demanded his resignation.

It’s unclear who will take over as prime minister since opposition leader Nikol Pashinyan most likely won’t have enough votes.

In the meantime, former Prime Minister Karen Karapetian will stand in for Sargsyan until a new PM is elected.

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All Marana and Sahuarita schools to close Thursday during Arizona teachers’ walkout

Sahuarita Unified School District also will close all its schools on both Thursday and Friday, as more than half of its teachers told district officials they plan to take part in the strike. … Tucson Unified School District, the city’s largest, expects to announce Tuesday afternoon whether it will close schools.

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Armenian Lawmakers Will Vote For A New Prime Minister Soon


Watch Video

Armenian lawmakers will vote for a new prime minister May 1.

The former Prime Minister Serzh Sargsyan resigned Monday after more than a week of protests called for him to step down.

Sargsyan had been president of Armenia since 2008. Then, as his second and last term was winding down, the country’s constitution was amended to give the position of prime minister more power and make the presidential seat more of a ceremonial role.

Eight days after his presidential term was up, Sargsyan was elected Armenia’s prime minister. Anti-government protesters took to the streets and demanded his resignation.

It’s unclear who will take over as prime minister since opposition leader Nikol Pashinyan most likely won’t have enough votes.

In the meantime, former Prime Minister Karen Karapetian will stand in for Sargsyan until a new PM is elected.

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13 Children Are Dead After A Train And A School Bus Crash In India


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A train and a school bus crashed in India, killing 13 children and injuring nine other people, including the driver. That’s according to local police.

The bus was crossing an unmanned railway when the crash happened. The government has ordered an investigation, but officials told reporters the van driver was responsible.

Earlier in April, a school bus went off one of the country’s mountain roads, killing at least 27 people.

Additional reporting from Newsy affiliate CNN.

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Giuliani Met With Mueller To Discuss Possible Trump Interview


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Rudy Giuliani reportedly met with special counsel Robert Mueller earlier this week to restart negotiations for a possible interview with the president.

Over the course of Mueller’s investigation, there’s been some back-and-forth over whether or not President Donald Trump would sit down for an interview.

CBS News reported talks between the two teams stalled after the the FBI raided the office and home of Trump’s personal attorney Michael Cohen earlier this month.

Since then, Giuliani, a former New York City mayor, joined Trump’s legal team. It’s reportedly his job to serve as a liaison between Trump’s and Mueller’s teams.

Unnamed sources familiar with the Tuesday meeting told The Washington Post it was pretty informal. When Giuliani reportedly said Trump is still opposed to a possible interview, sources say Mueller stressed that getting to question Trump would help with the obstruction of justice part of his probe.

Trump’s repeatedly denied there was any collusion between Russia and his campaign.

Additional reporting from Newsy affiliate CNN.

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Giving Antibiotics To Healthy Kids In Poor Countries Could Save Lives


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Researchers say just two doses a year of a common antibiotic could save the lives of thousands of newborns and infants in poor countries.

In a new study published Wednesday, nearly 200,000 children under the age of 5 in three African countries were given either a dose of azithromycin or a placebo pill once every six months.

After two years, researchers found the mortality rate among the children who took the antibiotic was about 14 percent lower overall.

The study’s authors aren’t exactly sure why the antibiotics had this effect. Azithromycin is used to stop the growth of bacteria that cause diseases like pneumonia and diarrhea, which are deadly to newborns.

But giving antibiotics to otherwise healthy children could put others at risk by potentially creating antibiotic-resistant diseases. 

As one doctor told NPR, “We’re taught not to give antibiotics when kids aren’t sick, and here we’re doing just that.”

According to the World Health Organization, 15,000 children under the age of 5 die every day.

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