Students deem ‘die-in’ gun-control protest successful despite lack of response from Gov. Ducey

Fortesa Latifi and Jenna Miller

Saturday, April 21, 2018

Students deem ‘die-in’ gun-control protest successful despite lack of response from Gov. Ducey

PHOENIX – Three high schoolers filed into the waiting room outside Gov. Doug Ducey’s office at 4:17 p.m. They lay down on the floor and settled in, with a plan to wait until one of two things happened: either authorities would arrest them or Ducey would agree to meet with them.

In the lobby of the House of Representatives and the Senate, about 100 other activists were doing the same thing. They had organized the protest for Friday, the 19th anniversary of the Columbine High School shooting. It was part of a national effort for gun control born out of the tragedy in Parkland, Florida.

In the waiting room outside Ducey’s office, two other students joined the “die-in” 15 minutes later. Dawn Motley, a junior at Mountain View High School, lay on the floor with her hands crossed over her chest. She held a Constitution tightly between her fingers.

The Friday night “die-in” made national headlines, drawing attention to the students’ cause. It didn’t, however, spur Ducey to action. Ducey, a Republican up for re-election this year, on Saturday released a statement through a spokesman that did not address the Friday protest, but it mentioned the governor’s “Safe Arizona Schools” plan.

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The statement called the plan, which has not yet received legislative approval, a “common sense proposal to make our schools and communities safer.”

On Saturday morning, the students spoke at a news conference on the Capitol lawn, where they decried Ducey’s lack of response to their protest and their treatment during the “die-in.” They promised repercussions on Election Day if Ducey does not agree to their request for a meeting.

Jacob Martinez, one of the student protesters, told Cronkite News on Saturday their efforts were worth it because they sent a clear message to Ducey. Cronkite News journalists witnessed the six-hour protest, and here’s what happened:

Motley said the “die-in” was a result of Ducey’s earlier refusals to meet with the students.

“Enough is enough,” she said. “We’ve been asked to be brought to the table for over a month now, and it’s escalated to this.”

Read more

Students deem ‘die-in’ gun-control protest successful despite lack of response from Gov. Ducey

Fortesa Latifi and Jenna Miller

Saturday, April 21, 2018

Students deem ‘die-in’ gun-control protest successful despite lack of response from Gov. Ducey

PHOENIX – Three high schoolers filed into the waiting room outside Gov. Doug Ducey’s office at 4:17 p.m. They lay down on the floor and settled in, with a plan to wait until one of two things happened: either authorities would arrest them or Ducey would agree to meet with them.

In the lobby of the House of Representatives and the Senate, about 100 other activists were doing the same thing. They had organized the protest for Friday, the 19th anniversary of the Columbine High School shooting. It was part of a national effort for gun control born out of the tragedy in Parkland, Florida.

In the waiting room outside Ducey’s office, two other students joined the “die-in” 15 minutes later. Dawn Motley, a junior at Mountain View High School, lay on the floor with her hands crossed over her chest. She held a Constitution tightly between her fingers.

The Friday night “die-in” made national headlines, drawing attention to the students’ cause. It didn’t, however, spur Ducey to action. Ducey, a Republican up for re-election this year, on Saturday released a statement through a spokesman that did not address the Friday protest, but it mentioned the governor’s “Safe Arizona Schools” plan.

[su_divider top=”no” size=”2″ margin=”10″]

Related Stories

Democratic activists urge Gov. Ducey to take bigger steps toward gun safety
Arizona students stage ‘die-in’ outside governor’s office to demand action on gun violence
Slurs, support on social media mark gun-control movement
[su_divider top=”no” size=”2″ margin=”10″]

The statement called the plan, which has not yet received legislative approval, a “common sense proposal to make our schools and communities safer.”

On Saturday morning, the students spoke at a news conference on the Capitol lawn, where they decried Ducey’s lack of response to their protest and their treatment during the “die-in.” They promised repercussions on Election Day if Ducey does not agree to their request for a meeting.

Jacob Martinez, one of the student protesters, told Cronkite News on Saturday their efforts were worth it because they sent a clear message to Ducey. Cronkite News journalists witnessed the six-hour protest, and here’s what happened:

Motley said the “die-in” was a result of Ducey’s earlier refusals to meet with the students.

“Enough is enough,” she said. “We’ve been asked to be brought to the table for over a month now, and it’s escalated to this.”

Read more

Whistleblowers: Personal Pettiness on TUSD board perpetuate Pueblo problematic principal as Hicks saves Auggie Romero

Auggie insists that things have improved at Pueblo. He has pages and pages of rhetoric which he uses to convince people of the great improvements he has made at Pueblo. It is all manure. He knows it is all a lie but he is a convincing liar so he continues. He also knows how to cheat and manipulate numbers so that he can distort the facts to his benefit.

Have things gotten better at Pueblo? Well, if you like the lack of accountability; yes.

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Students deem ‘die-in’ gun-control protest successful despite lack of response from Gov. Ducey

Fortesa Latifi and Jenna Miller

Saturday, April 21, 2018

Students deem ‘die-in’ gun-control protest successful despite lack of response from Gov. Ducey

PHOENIX – Three high schoolers filed into the waiting room outside Gov. Doug Ducey’s office at 4:17 p.m. They lay down on the floor and settled in, with a plan to wait until one of two things happened: either authorities would arrest them or Ducey would agree to meet with them.

In the lobby of the House of Representatives and the Senate, about 100 other activists were doing the same thing. They had organized the protest for Friday, the 19th anniversary of the Columbine High School shooting. It was part of a national effort for gun control born out of the tragedy in Parkland, Florida.

In the waiting room outside Ducey’s office, two other students joined the “die-in” 15 minutes later. Dawn Motley, a junior at Mountain View High School, lay on the floor with her hands crossed over her chest. She held a Constitution tightly between her fingers.

The Friday night “die-in” made national headlines, drawing attention to the students’ cause. It didn’t, however, spur Ducey to action. Ducey, a Republican up for re-election this year, on Saturday released a statement through a spokesman that did not address the Friday protest, but it mentioned the governor’s “Safe Arizona Schools” plan.

[su_divider top=”no” size=”2″ margin=”10″]

Related Stories

Democratic activists urge Gov. Ducey to take bigger steps toward gun safety
Arizona students stage ‘die-in’ outside governor’s office to demand action on gun violence
Slurs, support on social media mark gun-control movement
[su_divider top=”no” size=”2″ margin=”10″]

The statement called the plan, which has not yet received legislative approval, a “common sense proposal to make our schools and communities safer.”

On Saturday morning, the students spoke at a news conference on the Capitol lawn, where they decried Ducey’s lack of response to their protest and their treatment during the “die-in.” They promised repercussions on Election Day if Ducey does not agree to their request for a meeting.

Jacob Martinez, one of the student protesters, told Cronkite News on Saturday their efforts were worth it because they sent a clear message to Ducey. Cronkite News journalists witnessed the six-hour protest, and here’s what happened:

Motley said the “die-in” was a result of Ducey’s earlier refusals to meet with the students.

“Enough is enough,” she said. “We’ve been asked to be brought to the table for over a month now, and it’s escalated to this.”

Read more

Students deem ‘die-in’ gun-control protest successful despite lack of response from Gov. Ducey

Fortesa Latifi and Jenna Miller

Saturday, April 21, 2018

Students deem ‘die-in’ gun-control protest successful despite lack of response from Gov. Ducey

PHOENIX – Three high schoolers filed into the waiting room outside Gov. Doug Ducey’s office at 4:17 p.m. They lay down on the floor and settled in, with a plan to wait until one of two things happened: either authorities would arrest them or Ducey would agree to meet with them.

In the lobby of the House of Representatives and the Senate, about 100 other activists were doing the same thing. They had organized the protest for Friday, the 19th anniversary of the Columbine High School shooting. It was part of a national effort for gun control born out of the tragedy in Parkland, Florida.

In the waiting room outside Ducey’s office, two other students joined the “die-in” 15 minutes later. Dawn Motley, a junior at Mountain View High School, lay on the floor with her hands crossed over her chest. She held a Constitution tightly between her fingers.

The Friday night “die-in” made national headlines, drawing attention to the students’ cause. It didn’t, however, spur Ducey to action. Ducey, a Republican up for re-election this year, on Saturday released a statement through a spokesman that did not address the Friday protest, but it mentioned the governor’s “Safe Arizona Schools” plan.

[su_divider top=”no” size=”2″ margin=”10″]

Related Stories

Democratic activists urge Gov. Ducey to take bigger steps toward gun safety
Arizona students stage ‘die-in’ outside governor’s office to demand action on gun violence
Slurs, support on social media mark gun-control movement
[su_divider top=”no” size=”2″ margin=”10″]

The statement called the plan, which has not yet received legislative approval, a “common sense proposal to make our schools and communities safer.”

On Saturday morning, the students spoke at a news conference on the Capitol lawn, where they decried Ducey’s lack of response to their protest and their treatment during the “die-in.” They promised repercussions on Election Day if Ducey does not agree to their request for a meeting.

Jacob Martinez, one of the student protesters, told Cronkite News on Saturday their efforts were worth it because they sent a clear message to Ducey. Cronkite News journalists witnessed the six-hour protest, and here’s what happened:

Motley said the “die-in” was a result of Ducey’s earlier refusals to meet with the students.

“Enough is enough,” she said. “We’ve been asked to be brought to the table for over a month now, and it’s escalated to this.”

Read more

Meet the Hunza People- the Healthiest people on Earth

Eternal life is our obsession from the first days of humanity. The oldest literal text that we know up to date, Ep of Gilgamesh, for the subject has a story of the search for immortality. Some millenniums passed but we haven’t achieved our goal. For true, life expectancy these days is much longer than it […]

The post Meet the Hunza People- the Healthiest people on Earth appeared first on AnonHQ.

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DOJ Reportedly Launched Antitrust Investigation Into Verizon, AT&T


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The Justice Department is reportedly investigating whether Verizon and AT&T worked with a telecommunications standards group to block a new technology that would allow people to switch carriers more easily.

Verizon and AT&T dominate the industry with around 70 percent of U.S. wireless subscriptions. A new technology called eSim might have threatened that — it would allow users to switch carriers remotely without buying a new carrier-specific SIM card.

The DOJ is reportedly looking into whether there was an effort to make that technology effectively useless.

The DOJ hasn’t confirmed the investigation, but AT&T said in a statement it was working with investigators. The investigation reportedly started when Apple filed a complaint.

Additional reporting by Newsy affiliate CNN.

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